Constructing the model

Published: 15 November 2015
Last edited: 13 January 2020
Construction of the 3D model took place over 3-4 days at both a community hall and 'on country' at the Djunbunji offices. Elders, youth, Rangers, men, women and children and the Authority's facilitator participated in the model building. Participants used contour maps, foamcore board, tracing paper, pencils and craft knives to trace and cut each 20m contour. Each contour layer was then pasted on to the tables and built up to create a 'blank' model. On completion of the construction, crepe paper and toilet tissue were pasted over the model to smoothe out hillslopes and soften the shape. The community hall was used for 2 full days where the bulk of the construction was completed. Following that, several community members continued to work on the model at Djunbunji office and in their homes until completion.

Classifications

Category
Education, training and other capacity development activities
Communication, outreach and awareness building
Evaluation, effectiveness measures and learning
Other
Partnership, Technical method, technique, tool
Scale of implementation
Local
Subnational
Global

Enabling factors

Using a community hall is key to ensuring enough space, and that participants are not sitting on the dirt/ground. This keeps model materials clean, unbent and organised. Construction taking place on the Indigenous group's traditional lands ensures people are more comfortable in their surroundings. Systematic approach and regular 'truthing' of model as building progresses - allowing participants to group themselves into 'teams' so that systems are established and followed. Enough participants involved to allow rest time

Lessons learned

Establishing a systematic approach and regular truthing/checking will reduce the chance of large mistakes. Additionally ensuring participants can understand the logic of 'landscape' (eg 20m contour is underneath the 40 m etc) will assist them to have undertake logic truthing of the model 'on the fly'. The facilitator should have a clear understanding of how much progress should be achieved each day and be able to keep participants on track